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  • Writer's pictureAnthony Wu

CSDA/CCAD Presents: Tea, Art, and Culture - The Design Evolution of Japanese Tea Ceramics of the Late Edo Period


Eiraku Hozen, 1795‑1854, active in Kyoto, Tea Bowl ("chawan"), Between 1827 and 1849, Earthenware, painted decoration in underglaze iron oxide brown over buff slip, The Montreal Museum of Fine Arts (MMFA), gift of Teruha Kagemori, Photo MMFA, Christine Guest.

CSDA/CCAD Sundays: Expert Series presents 

Sunday, May 5, 2024, 3 p.m. - 4:30 p.m. (EST)


The tea ceremony was the central cultural sphere of Japan’s Edo period (1615–1868), in which social, political, and artistic ties were formed. The collection of ceramics, utensils, and decorative arts created for the tea ceremony is one of the most significant categories in Japan’s artistic canon.


Early Edo workshops, such as Raku and Oribe, are well-known for austere and rustic designs that emphasized their handmade origins.


Join art appraiser, Harrison Schley, in conversation with Asian art consultant, Anthony Wu, as they discuss the evolution of styles and forms of tea wares during the second half of the Edo period, which reflect the growing popularity of literati culture and Chinese aesthetics. During this time period, ceramics made by artists such as Eiraku Hozen, Ogata Shūhei, and Mori Yūsetsu took on a refined, ornate, and decorative style. Artists’ seals were often stamped or incorporated into the design schemes of tea wares, reflecting the makers’ identification with Chinese and Japanese literati circles and the artists’ move toward self-promotion and branding.



(Complimentary registration for CSDA members, non-members/Ornamentum subscribers $10) 


Not sure you can attend live? We've got you covered! A video recording of this presentation will be made available to all those who reserve/purchase tickets.


BIOGRAPHIES


Harrison Schley is an art appraiser specializing in Asian art and Judaica. Harrison received his Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania in 2020 focusing on Japanese art and history. He has worked with museum collections across the United States and Japan, including extensive experience at the National Museum of Asian Art, Smithsonian Institution, and the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Harrison Schley Appraisals offers art collections consulting and management as well as valuations for estate taxes and equitable division, charitable donations, divorce, and insurance.

 

Anthony Wu is an Asian Art consultant and researcher specializing in Chinese decorative and fine art for various auction houses and clients in Canada and the USA. Recently, he has been in charge of setting up Asian Art auctions at Heffel Gallery. Anthony has a B.A. and M.A. in Art History from the University of Toronto. He is a Certified Member with the Appraisers Association of America. He is also a consultant and official Asian Art blogger for the New York-based auction platform Bidsquare, a regular contributor to Orientations magazine in Hong Kong, and is a board member for the Canadian Society of Decorative Arts, the Gardiner Museum and the Canadian Association of Personal Property Appraisers. His goal is to provide excellent customer service based on the requirements of his clients, whether it is identifying, selling, or acquiring Asian Art pieces.

 

Images:

(2012.168.1‑6), Eiraku Hozen, 1795‑1854, active in Kyoto, Tea Bowl ("chawan"), Between 1827 and 1849, Earthenware, painted decoration in underglaze iron oxide brown over buff slip, The Montreal Museum of Fine Arts (MMFA), gift of Teruha Kagemori, Photo MMFA, Christine Guest.

(l) Harrison Schley, courtesy H. Schley, (r) Anthony Wu, courtesy A. Wu


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